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Author Topic: Japanese Highways, Bridges and Interchanges  (Read 1914 times)
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Pmdb
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« on: January 19, 2009, 06:51:02 PM »

Japan saw most of its infrastructure bombed back to the stone age in the final years of World War II, which makes the country's post-war rejuvenation all the more astounding. Huge, complex public works projects saw a concrete & steel web of highways, bridges and interchanges blossom from the wreckage of war.

Today, shaped by the demands of restrictive space and economic boom & bust, Japan's hardened transportation arteries display artistic forms that go far beyond their functions.




Above left is the Hakozaki Junction, part of the Metropolitan Expressway in Tokyo, and at right is the Hokko Junction in Osaka... These images illustrate the solution engineers used when building multi-lane highway interchanges in some of the world's most crowded cities in Japan: go vertical!


The Hokko Junction shown above - a part of the Hanshin Expressway near Japan's second city, Osaka.


Also in Osaka is the Higashiosaka (East Osaka) Loop of the Hanshin Expressway.



When engineers have space to work with, they take full advantage. This wide field view of the Higashiosaka interchange shows the almost organic complexity of a busy cloverleaf, resembling a living creature's circulatory system with the vehicles acting as blood cells.





Highways upon highways... without any end in sight

The incredible Japanese road infrastructure really took off in the 1960s - check out the vintage photo on the right:



Such "Bladerunner" sights are commonplace now, brimming with urban energy






Some sections of the Hanshin Expressway suffered severe damage during the 7.2 magnitude Great Hanshin Earthquake which hit the Kobe, Japan area in January of 1995, killing over 5,500 people and costing over $200 billion.


On the bright side, the affected sections of the highway did not "pancake", as happened in the 1989 Loma Prieta quake, but instead slipped sideways and tumbled over. Either way, one doesn't want to be driving through a highway interchange or junction when a big quake hits!

Which came first, the highway or the building? The question is moot as both have learned to accommodate one another. The Hanshin Expressway takes a shortcut through the 5th to 7th floors of Fukushima's Gate Tower building, also known as the Bee Hive.



The story goes that the original building's owner wanted to knock it down and rebuild, but was told by city planners that the space was being allocated to a newly planned exit of the expressway. Both sides refused to budge, and the compromise was completed in 1992.

The 570 meter (1,870 ft) long Rainbow Bridge spans the northern (inner) part of Tokyo Bay and has been a city landmark since it opened in 1993. Two roadways, a transit line and pedestrian walkways all use the bridge, resulting in a seemingly chaotic tangle from certain angles.







Announced in 1969, the massive Kobe-Naruto highway route project stretches 81 kilometers to connect Japan's main island of Honshu with the much smaller island of Shikoku to the south. The jewel in the crown is the 4-kilometer long Akashi Kaikyo Bridge, which cost $3.6 billion to build over the ten year period between 1988 and 1998




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R-O-V-Rat
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« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2009, 08:45:42 PM »

Dis nou in klomp concrete en staal daai he!!! Is nogals spectacular.
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AKA Rowwerot
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« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2009, 11:27:06 PM »

Amazing!
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“Remember what Bilbo used to say: It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don't keep your feet, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to.”
lox
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« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2009, 08:04:29 AM »

vrekkit

haal my hoed af vir die wat dit uitdink en die wat dit bou
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Bly nederig en waardeer wat jy het, dit kan binne oomblikke van jou weggeneem word.
JC
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« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2009, 08:23:18 AM »

'n Bewys van die land se welvarendheid.
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Guilty As Sin
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« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2009, 08:41:37 AM »

dis soos kuns vir my
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Ponkie
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« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2009, 11:51:02 AM »

Baie nice, maar ek dink as jy daar verdwaal sal 'n GPS jou nie eens kan help nie.
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« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2009, 11:55:51 AM »

Lyk baie soos die paaie in daai een "Need for Speed" game Big Grin
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“Remember what Bilbo used to say: It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don't keep your feet, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to.”
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« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2009, 12:08:28 PM »

need 4 speed Tokyo drif  as ek dit nie mis het nie
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